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August 22 2012

Using dual monitors with Remote Desktop

One of the features of the Terminal Server/Remote Desktop Client in Windows 7/Windows Server 2008 is the support for multiple monitors.  If the machine running the TS-Client has a multi-monitor configuration that creates one logical rectangle, then the TS-Client can span over all the monitors, creating one virtual desktop of the combined size.

Specifically, the client needs the following for span mode to work correctly:
o Equal resolution monitors
o Total resolution of all monitors not exceeding 4096 x 2048
o Top-left monitor being the primary So, with this basic setup, let’s jump right in!

Step 1. Check the basics

Make sure both your monitors are using the same resolution and are oriented horizontally. Right click on the desktop. Click Properties.

In the Display Properties tab, make sure the monitors have the same resolution and are oriented horizontally. If not, adjust your monitor resolution and position so they are.

Step 2. Get the right version of Remote Desktop client

Check if you have the right version of Remote Desktop Connection client. You need at least version 6.0In the Start Menu > Run… dialog, type “mstsc” and hit enter.

The acronym “mstsc” stands for “Microsoft Terminal Services Client” – another name for Remote Desktop Connection client. You can also start it from Start Menu > All Programs > Accessories > Remote Desktop Connection (or Accessories > Connections > Remote Desktop Connection)

The Remote Desktop Connection program should open up.

Click the monitor icon in the top-left corner of this dialog, and choose the “About” menu:

This will show the version of the Remote Desktop Connection client. It should be version 6.0 or higher:

If you have an older version, first download and install the newer version from http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=6E1EC93D-BDBD-4…

Step 3. Connect to remote computer in ‘span mode’

To have the Remote Desktop connection client use both your monitors, you need to start it in “span” mode. This is done by giving the following command in the Run dialog: mstsc /span

Open Start Menu, click Run. Then type in mstsc /span and hit Enter or Click OK


When the Remote Desktop client opens up, enter the remote computer name to which you are connecting, and click Connect.

The Remote session should open up and cover both your monitors.

Once you have this working, you may want to launch the remote session in an easier way instead of typing the ‘mstsc /span’ command everytime.

The next section shows how you can create an “RDP file”, so you can launch a spanned remote desktop session by just double-clicking a file/shortcut.

Creating an RDP file to launch a spanned remote desktop session covering multiple monitors

Create the RDP file

Open Start Menu, click Run. Then type in mstsc /span and hit Enter or Click OK

When the Remote Desktop client opens up, enter the remote computer name to which you are connecting, and DON’T click Connect. Instead, click the Options button.

The window will open up to reveal more options:

Click the “Save As” button. A “Save As” dialog will open to save the connection settings to a file. Save the file to a known folder, and with a name like remoteserver.rdp. In this example, let’s say we saved it to C:\remoteserver.rdp

Now, close the Remote Desktop Connection program. We are done with this for now.

Editing the RDP file

Open Windows Explorer, and browse to the folder containing the file you just saved (C:\remoteserver.rdp). Right click the file > choose Open With… menu > Choose Program…

In the Open With dialog, choose Notepad to open the file. Remember to NOT check/enable the “Always use the selected program to open this kind of file” option.

Click OK. The file should open up in Notepad. It is a file with many lines. We need to edit this and add one more line.

In the last line of the file, add the following command and hit Enter:
span monitors:i:1

The file should look something like this (note the last line added manually):

Save the file (File menu > Save) and exit Notepad.

Double click… and connect!

From now on, you can connect to the remote computer using both monitors (in span mode) by just double-clicking this file. To add a shortcut to your desktop, right click the file, and choose “Send To> Desktop (create shortcut)”. This will place a shortcut to this file on your desktop, and you can just double click the shortcut to remotely connect to the remote computer using multiple monitors in span mode.

July 20 2012

“Send to” Function not working properly in SharePoint 2010?

I recently had an issue with a  new install of SharePoint 2010.  A user was trying to send/copy documents between libraries on the site, and the “send to” function was not available, it was grayed-out.  After a little research, I found that there is an add-on in Internet Explorer that can cause problems with the “send to” feature of SharePoint.  To fix this problem, go to “Manage Add-ons” in the Internet Explorer tools menu.  Change the view to “show all add-ons”, and disable “STSUpld CopyCtl Class”.  Your “send to” should now work without a problem.

-Mike

March 25 2010

Enable Admin Audit Logging Exchange 2010

Exchange 2010 allows auditing of administrative actions. All actions can be audited or just specific cmdlets and parameters. To enable Audit Logging open the Exchange Management Shell and run the following commands.

Audit All cmdlets
Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogCmdlets *
or
Only audit New-Mailbox, all transport rules, all management, all set-transport cmdlets
Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogCmdlets New-Mailbox, *TransportRule, *Management, Set-Transport*

Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogParameters *

or

Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogParameters Database, *Address*, Custom*, *Region
Audits just the parameters that have Database, all parameters with *Address*, begins with Custom, ends with Region.

Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogMailbox [email protected]
All auditing is sent to the mailbox of AdminAudit.

Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogEnabled $True

 

SetAdminAuditLogEMS

All of the commands can be run on a single line if you prefer.

After creating a new mailbox by either using the EMC or the EMS, an email is sent to the AdminAudit Mailbox. Make sure the Mailbox is secured appropriately and archive or delete the mail after a specified amount of time. A command Set-AdminAuditLogConfig –AdminAuditLogAgeLimit DD.HH:MM:SS is not available for the RTM release of 2010 so be sure to watch the size of the mailbox.

Below is a screenshot of the message sent to the AdminAudit Mailbox after creating a new Mailbox and User.

AdminAuditLogEmail

January 15 2009

ISInc e-Learning

Do you have staff in remote locations, and find it difficult to get them the training they need? There comes a time when your resource is too valuable to send off site for a class.  This is where ISInc’s e-Learning can come into play.  Now your students can access the same classes via their desktop computer.  

ISInc’s e-Learning training is live, interactive online training for those who would like to attend one of our face-to-face instructor-led training courses without leaving their offices, homes or classrooms.  Learners can listen to the presentation, ask questions, hear others’ questions and get live answers, all from wherever they choose.  They can engage in discussions with others in the physical classroom and  throughout the country who are involved in the same class session.

ISInc’s e-Learning training blends the best from traditional face-to-face instructor-led training with the latest in conferencing technology, allowing us to deliver live training to multiple locations at one time.  This model is based on our over 27 years experience as trainers and the general premise that the classroom is the foundation of a great training experience.

All courses offered at ISInc can be taken online via our live e-Learning training using Microsoft Lync. So, if you have employees in remote offices that you are trying to schedule for IT training, consider ISInc e-Learning Training. Please contact us for more information.

For more information on our e-learning and to view a video on how it all works, visit our e-learning page here.

November 19 2008

Using Windows XP Task Scheduler to Automate an FTP Upload

I recently came across a problem where I needed to schedule the daily FTP upload of a set of files to one of my client’s FTP servers. I was a bit out of my element and found that locating a solution to this task was surprisingly challenging. I thought I would post the steps here so that someone in a similar situation might benefit from the time I spent in trial and error.

1. My first goal was to make sure I could upload via ftp using the command prompt in Windows XP. I created the following script, ftp_script.txt, which I placed in a scripts folder on the C drive:

open www.yourhostname.com
username
password
put c:\test.txt test.txt
quit

Plug in your corresponding hostname, username, password, and file locations. This script will upload the local copy of test.txt to the server. The above script can be passed into your command line ftp client. Open up your command prompt and type:

ftp -s:path_to_script\scriptfile

Which, in my case, was:

ftp -s:c:\scripts\ftp_script.txt

The “-s” allows you to specify a file name in order to pass your username, password, and put commands to the command line ftp client.

2. If you get Step 1 working, the next step is to create a command file to run the ftp script. The command file is just a text file with a .cmd extension that calls up the command line ftp. In my case, I created ftp.cmd with the contents:

ftp -s:c:\scripts\ftp_script.txt

Test your command file by double clicking it to make sure that it executes the FTP successfully.

3. Finally, create a daily task using the Windows Task Scheduler. Go to Start > Control Panel > Scheduled Tasks (in Classic view). Click Add Scheduled Task and when it prompts you for the application, browse to your command file that you created in Step 2. As you finish out the task scheduler, you’ll get to choose how often you want the task to run and at what time.

After you complete these steps, your ftp job should be ready and waiting for its next scheduled execution time. I hope you find this trick as useful as I did!

November 4 2008

SharePoint Consulting Services

Are you trying to kick off a successful project using Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007? Do you want to make sure you install and implement it using the industry best practices? Are you migrating from 2003 to 2007?

ISInc can help you kick off a successful implementation with SharePoint with our packaged consulting offerings!

More »

What is Microsoft Forefront?

This is exactly the question that I asked Tom Shinder, a Microsoft MVP on the Forefront Security product. He spent some time and came up with this posting for us to help you understand Microsoft’s offering around Forefront.

What is Microsoft Forefront?

Have you heard friends or colleagues mention Microsoft Forefront and wonder what they were talking about? If so, you’re not alone, as Microsoft Forefront is relatively new and just beginning to get real traction in the network security market.

The first thing you need to know is that there is no “Forefront” product. Instead, Forefront is a collection of Microsoft security products. This collection of Forefront security products is referred to as the “Forefront Security Suite”

More »

October 10 2008

Record Selection and the Null Value Bug in Crystal Reports

One of the interesting issues I have found when building reports in Crystal is the nature of their record selection on blank data. More »

September 17 2008

5 ways to “Green” your IT
Evergreen in Detail
Creative Commons License photo credit: Rob Shenk

Running an Enterprise IT Environment has more cost than just the equipment and power that is used. Now we need to keep in mind the entire eco-system to run our infrastructure, from the power each machine uses to the amount of time people need to support it. Running a “Green” IT will not only help the environment, it will often relieve some of the stress on your IT staff.

Here are some steps your IT group can take to make your company more environmentally friendly. More »

September 10 2008

New Web Design Courses

Learning web design can be easy with a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) editor, like Dreamweaver or Microsoft’s Expression Web. You create a new document and edit it like a PowerPoint slide or a new file in Microsoft Word. You add text, tables, and pictures. Voila, you have a web page.

More »